Getting Fortnite XBox One & PC Crossplay to Work

Alright, so if you’re reading this, you’ve probably read some popular articles by some others (maybe major news sources) and didn’t get far. Getting Fortnite crossplay between PC & Xbox wasn’t that straightforward (at least for me), but in the end, works great. I’m trying not to do what the other articles did, and provide long, unhelpful paragraphs, so let’s get right to it. Below is what worked for me:

  1. I’m assuming you’re already playing Fortnite on the Xbox. You need to link your Xbox account to an Epic Games account. Do this by opening the browser (Edge) on the Xbox. Visit https://www.epicgames.com/fortnite. In the top-right, click the person icon, click Xbox.
  2. After clicking the Xbox button on the people menu, create a new account w/ an email address & password. (I couldn’t find an easy way to link an existing Epic account, so I just created a new one). Now you have an Epic games account linked to an Xbox live account.
  3. On a PC (or Mac) download the Epic Games Launcher. You can use the same PC that has a different account playing Fortnite already.
  4. On the PC in Epic games login to the account used to play on PC and send a friend request to the username of the Xbox user.
  5. Again on the PC, login into Epic games (you’ll need to logout of the PC user) and login as the Xbox account you created in step 2.
  6. Since you’re logged into the Xbox account (on PC) you can accept the friend request that was sent in step 4.
  7. You can now logout on the PC and login to a PC playing account (if you have one).
  8. On the Xbox, start a new party, on PC, your friends (that you accepted in step 6) can choose to play with you.
  9. And now win.
  10. Note: the first time you play w/ someone on PC via Xbox, you’ll be asked to confirm that crossplay is okay. Make sure you accept this.

Hope this helps someone out there.

Crossplay is pretty seamless, voice chat works – and now you’ve got more folks to help you win!

 

 

 

Getting Fortnite XBox One & PC Crossplay to Work

Increase IIS Logs to SQL Log Parser Import Performance w/ transactionRowCount

A few years ago I showed how to use Microsoft’s Log Parser tool to take IIS log files and import into a SQL database.

From Microsoft: Log parser is a powerful, versatile tool that provides universal query access to text-based data such as log files, XML files and CSV files, as well as key data sources on the Windows® operating system such as the Event Log, the Registry, the file system, and Active Directory®. You tell Log Parser what information you need and how you want it processed. The results of your query can be custom-formatted in text based output, or they can be persisted to more specialty targets like SQL, SYSLOG, or a chart.

In short, using something like this to take IIS logs and dump into a new SQL table:

C:\Program Files (x86)\Log Parser 2.2>logparser “SELECT * INTO iisLogs FROM c:\temp\logs\*.log ” -i:iisw3c -o:SQL -server:localhost -database:webLogs -username:sa -password:yourpass -createTable: ON

But, if you’re importing tons of records, it might seem to take a while. BUT: you can use the option “transactionRowCount” to gain some performance. The transactionRowCount option determines how many rows are included in each transaction. By default, transactionRowCount is 1, so after every row, the transaction is committed. If you set it to “-1” it will include everything in 1 large transaction.

Test Results

Below a did a few tests. My test included 36,000,000 rows. Continue reading “Increase IIS Logs to SQL Log Parser Import Performance w/ transactionRowCount”

Increase IIS Logs to SQL Log Parser Import Performance w/ transactionRowCount

How To Create A Simple .Net Core (c#) AWS Lambda Function – Start to Finish

Creating a simple, serverless app w/ AWS Lambda is fairly easy, but some documentation out there is outdated or using the preview toolkit. Below are some steps that show how to do this today, in a few steps. I’m using Visual Studio 2017. I’m also going to assume you already have your AWS credentials on your machine, if not, that’s a different topic.

  1. Install the AWS Toolkit for Visual Studio 2017 for Visual Studio. This is required to give you the project templates.
  2. Open Visual Studio and start a new project, choose “AWS Lambda Project” and give your project a name (I picked “awsLambdaTest”)
  3. At the Blueprint choice, choose “empty” then click “finish”.
  4. Your project will now create after a few seconds and should look like this:
  5. You can edit your code (in Function.cs)
  6. If you don’t edit anything and publish
  7. Now give your function a name and choose “next”:
  8. Now choose a role, the lambda_exec role is fine, then click “upload”.
  9. By default, the Lambda Function view will appear – this allows you to test your function. If you enter a string in the box under “sample input” and press “invoke”, you’ll see your function response.
How To Create A Simple .Net Core (c#) AWS Lambda Function – Start to Finish

Convert MP4 Video to WEBM & OGV (OGG) using FFMPEG

If you use the html5 video element, you probably want to also include webm & ogv videos to help make your video more accessible on browsers. (I won’t get into using the element, but it’s fairly simple.) What I do want to share is an easy way to take our source video (maybe .mp4 or .mov) and convert it to .webm and .ogv. This solution uses the freely available FFMPEG – it’s been around forever, and many of the pay software “utilities” you could buy just use it in the background. Let’s get to it. Continue reading “Convert MP4 Video to WEBM & OGV (OGG) using FFMPEG”

Convert MP4 Video to WEBM & OGV (OGG) using FFMPEG

Creating Valid ZIP Archives of Multiple Files in C# / .Net

Are .zip files ever going away? I remember back in the 90’s using WinZip as an alternative to the PKZip command line option. Anyway, fast forward 20+ years, and ZIP is still common and a great way to package files. Long story short: AWS Elastic Beanstalk allows you to easily deploy apps using a .zip file (if you haven’t tried Elastic Beanstalk – it’s pretty awesome) and I wanted a faster way to create a .zip of an app. (Yes, I know it’s not the best way to deploy like Git or the API).

There is a bunch of great sample code out there for creating ZIP archives in c# .Net using the ZipArchive Class in System.IO.Compression, but nothing seems to be a complete sample, showing multiple files. Below is what I’ve been using. One difference in this is changing the path separators from backslashes to forward-slashes. Without this, AWS wasn’t able to extract my .zip archive. I would see errors such as: Continue reading “Creating Valid ZIP Archives of Multiple Files in C# / .Net”

Creating Valid ZIP Archives of Multiple Files in C# / .Net

DIY Plywood, Wide Plank Floor – Start to Finish

Spoiler: this is the final result.

I needed a new floor for a bedroom that was being remodeled, I looked at every possible solution. Carpet, laminate, tile, hardwood, vinyl, even pennies. I had noticed a few folks using plywood, specifically cutting it down to planks. Jenny had the best guide that fit with what I was trying to do. After thinking more about this, and considering the room I needed the floor in is a kid’s bedroom, 2nd story, not perfectly level – it would be a great spot to try and make a plywood plank floor. I’m not going for a natural wood finish, I wanted something gray – with a bit of wood grain.

I’ll go into some detail on the steps, but if you’re looking to see the process at a glance, it was this: Continue reading “DIY Plywood, Wide Plank Floor – Start to Finish”

DIY Plywood, Wide Plank Floor – Start to Finish

Spider / Download Website with Wget on Windows

Wget has been around forever it seems, but is still get great tool for spidering or downloading content (all content) from a website to your local machine. Below are some simple steps to install Wget and to run it.

To install Wget:

  1. Visit http://gnuwin32.sourceforge.net/packages/wget.htm and download the setup file, labeled “Complete package, except sources”.
  2. Run the setup .exe and leave everything as defaults.
  3. In a command prompt (cmd.exe) change to the C:\Program Files (x86)\GnuWin32\bin> directory (or C:\Program Files\GnuWin32\bin if your on a 32 bit OS)
  4. To test, if you just run wget.exe it should return wget: missing URL

 

To download a website:

  1. In a command prompt (cmd.exe) change to the C:\Program Files (x86)\GnuWin32\bin> directory (or C:\Program Files\GnuWin32\bin if your on a 32 bit OS)
  2. Now run:
    wget -e robots=off --no-check-certificate --recursive --level=0 -P "c:\\somefolder" http://chrisbitting.com

    (obviously replace my website with your own)

In that folder, you should soon files from the site Wget copied.

I’ve only had issues with a site that I had forced to use SSL. Wget didn’t like that.

Spider / Download Website with Wget on Windows