Cloning an AWS CloudFront Distribution Easily

I’m often creating a new site that’s similar to others and has CloudFront in front of them (yes, think WordPress). Many of these distributions have a bunch of behaviors, and I hate to waste time trying to recreate them (copying and pasting, making sure I didn’t miss a step). Anyway, finally taking a little bit of time, I’ve found it’s straightforward to do it using the AWS CLI:

Steps to export, modify, and import a new CF config file with AWS cli:

  1. Install the CLI if you haven’t already. It’s relatively quick and straightforward, provided you have your access and secret keys. I’ve been using Version 2 of the CLI with great success. I’m primarily on Windows, so the below steps are respective of that.
  2. Using the CLI, export the CloudFront config of a distribution you want to copy. In my below example, you’ll need to swap out the distribution ID with one of your real distribution IDs (something like E3xxxxxxxxxx). Also, the c:\aws folder is whatever you want.

    aws2 cloudfront get-distribution-config --id YourDistID --output json > c:\aws\sourceCFconfig.json
  3. Take this json file, sourceCFconfig.json, copy it to a new file, newCFconfig.json.
  4. Open the new file, edit out the first parent element (be sure to remove the last curly bracket at the end of the file as well).
  5. Edit the Aliases to reflect your new site info (or remove if you’re not doing HTTPS).
  6. If you’re using a different origin for this distribution, change that as well, including in the behaviors (make use of find and replace)!
  7. Near the end of the doc, change the comment to something new:
  8. Change the ViewerCertificate to a valid certificate ARN (or remove if you’re not using HTTPS).
  9. Save this file you’ve been editing.
  10. Import this config and create a new distribution using the below command:

    aws2 cloudfront create-distribution --distribution-config file://c:\aws\newCFconfig.json

If no errors are shown, you should see a new distribution in CloudFront.

Cloning an AWS CloudFront Distribution Easily

Fixing WordPress Error: Maximum execution time of 30 seconds exceeded

If you have a WordPress install that is giving you this error:

Fatal error: Maximum execution time of 30 seconds exceeded in ...\wp-db.php on line ####

…It’s because PHP is timing out. The default timeout in PHP is 30 seconds, see here for details.

The fix:

The method I use for this is simple:

  1. Open your wp-config.php file in an editor (notepad, etc).
  2. Add this line to the top: set_time_limit(300);

The “300” can be any about of time (it’s seconds) you’d like.

The top of your file should like something like this:

wordpress-timeout

 

PS: You should only need to change this if you’re working on some kind of import /export or a one time process. If your blog requires this to run normally, their might be bad code or a server issue.

Fixing WordPress Error: Maximum execution time of 30 seconds exceeded

Removing WordPress Spam Comments In Bulk

I’ve encountered a few WordPress blogs that had been bombarded with spam comments (some over 200k comments – taking several gigs of db space). Usually these comments accumulated over a few months or years (many using Akismet) ‚Äď but if you’ve tried to delete thousands of comments through the WordPress admin, you might have noticed it taking very long and timing out.

Does your comments page look like this?
Does your comments page look like this?

 

Having these comments exist in your WordPress site only increases the size of the database, causing backups and migrations / upgrades to take longer. Unless you have plans to review thousands of comments (if so, you probably have too much time on your hands) you should be able to delete these in my opinion. The fastest option to remove the comments that I’ve found is to delete them from the database side (MySql).

Continue reading “Removing WordPress Spam Comments In Bulk”

Removing WordPress Spam Comments In Bulk

IIS / WordPress – Blocking User Agents using Rewrite Rules

wp_logo

If you run WordPress on Windows (and who doesn’t?) and have the need to block specific user agents (bots, crawlers, browsers) below is a decent way I’ve found that uses rewriting rules and works along side the needed WordPress rules:

Adding this rule to your web.config will block the request from the specified agent(s):

 <rule name="RequestBlockingRule1" stopProcessing="true">
          <match url=".*" />
          <conditions>
            <add input="{HTTP_USER_AGENT}" pattern="agent1|agent2|agent3" />
          </conditions>
          <action type="CustomResponse" statusCode="403"
             statusReason="Forbidden: Access is denied."
             statusDescription="You do not have permission to view this page." />
        </rule>

Continue reading “IIS / WordPress – Blocking User Agents using Rewrite Rules”

IIS / WordPress – Blocking User Agents using Rewrite Rules

WordPress Multisite Windows / IIS Login Redirect / Loop Issue

wp_logoIf you have WordPress installed on Windows (2008 / IIS) with multisite + sub domains enabled you may have run into the issue of login loops / redirects when  accessing /wp-admin. Below are a few spots you may want to confirm you have the correct URLs:

In the database:

Table / Field

wp_blogs / domain
wp_options / siteurl
wp_options / home
wp_sitemeta / siteurl    (don't forget this one!)

Also check these tables in any additional sites (ie: wp_2_options).

Config Files
wp-config.php:

define('DOMAIN_CURRENT_SITE', 'www.yourdomain.com');

I also have this in my wp-config.php:

define('ADMIN_COOKIE_PATH', '/');
define('COOKIE_DOMAIN', '');
define('COOKIEPATH', '');
define('SITECOOKIEPATH', '');

Web Config
Below is my successful web.config

<?xml version="1.0" encoding="UTF-8"?>
<configuration>
  <system.webServer>
    <rewrite>
      <rules>
        <rule name="WordPress Rule 1" stopProcessing="true">
          <match url="^index\.php$" ignoreCase="false" />
          <action type="None" />
        </rule>
        <rule name="WordPress Rule 2" stopProcessing="true">
          <match url="^([_0-9a-zA-Z-]+/)?wp-admin$" ignoreCase="false" />
          <action type="Redirect" url="{R:1}wp-admin/" redirectType="Permanent" />
        </rule>
        <rule name="WordPress Rule 3" stopProcessing="true">
          <match url="^" ignoreCase="false" />
          <conditions logicalGrouping="MatchAny">
            <add input="{REQUEST_FILENAME}" matchType="IsFile" ignoreCase="false" />
            <add input="{REQUEST_FILENAME}" matchType="IsDirectory" ignoreCase="false" />
          </conditions>
          <action type="None" />
        </rule>
        <rule name="WordPress Rule 4" stopProcessing="true">
          <match url="^" ignoreCase="false" />
          <conditions logicalGrouping="MatchAny">
            <add input="{REQUEST_FILENAME}" matchType="IsFile" ignoreCase="false" />
            <add input="{REQUEST_FILENAME}" matchType="IsDirectory" ignoreCase="false" />
            <add input="{URL}" pattern="([a-zA-Z0-9\./_-]+)\.axd" />
          </conditions>
          <action type="None" />
        </rule>
        <rule name="WordPress Rule 5" stopProcessing="true">
          <match url="^[_0-9a-zA-Z-]+/(wp-(content|admin|includes).*)" ignoreCase="false" />
          <action type="Rewrite" url="{R:1}" />
        </rule>
        <rule name="WordPress Rule 6" stopProcessing="true">
          <match url="." ignoreCase="false" />
          <action type="Rewrite" url="index.php" />
        </rule>
      </rules>
    </rewrite>
    <httpRedirect enabled="false" destination="http://www.yourdomain.com" />
  </system.webServer>
</configuration>
WordPress Multisite Windows / IIS Login Redirect / Loop Issue